© Lorenzo Associates, Inc.
Why would anyone want to write a memoir that exposes their deepest personal secrets and experiences to the world? I have asked myself that question numerous times, and I found some answers in the book “Why We Write About Ourselves: Twenty Memoirists and Why They Expose Themselves (and Others) in the Name of Literature,” by Meredith Maran. For instance, Memorist Meghan Daum explains how writing personal essays gives her an opportunity to use her own experiences “as a lens to look at larger, more universal issues and phenomena.” Anne Lamott adds that she writes memoirs becuase she enjoys writing about “the process of healing, of developing, of growing up, of becoming who we were born to be instead of who we always agreed to be.”  And David Sheff calls memoir writing a life and death situation for himself, saying that “it was about trying to make sense of what was chaos in my brain and in our lives. It was also a kind of purging, a way of dealing with years of overwhelming emotion.” In the end, I think, it is a selfish endeavor with a bit of hoping that some readers may get something good out of reading about your personal journey.  It makes sense that my memoir writing is all over the place. Like life, it’s messy and constantly in flux. Hence, the work presented in this section of the XYZ website is not very organized or sequential at the present time, and they are not in there final proofread and edited form. The links below go to the “by George” blog, where these particular articles are labeled as “Posts from the ‘Where Now?’ Memoir.” Feel free to comment on these posts if there is something within them that strikes you in a positive or negative manner.  Many more posts coming on the near horizon.
© Lorenzo Associates, Inc.
Why would anyone want to write a memoir that exposes their deepest personal secrets and experiences to the world? I have asked myself that question numerous times, and I found some answers in the book “Why We Write About Ourselves: Twenty Memoirists and Why They Expose Themselves (and Others) in the Name of Literature,” by Meredith Maran. For instance, Memorist Meghan Daum explains how writing personal essays gives her an opportunity to use her own experiences “as a lens to look at larger, more universal issues and phenomena.” Anne Lamott adds that she writes memoirs becuase she enjoys writing about “the process of healing, of developing, of growing up, of becoming who we were born to be instead of who we always agreed to be.”  And David Sheff calls memoir writing a life and death situation for himself, saying that “it was about trying to make sense of what was chaos in my brain and in our lives. It was also a kind of purging, a way of dealing with years of overwhelming emotion.” In the end, I think, it is a selfish endeavor with a bit of hoping that some readers may get something good out of reading about your personal journey.  It makes sense that my memoir writing is all over the place. Like life, it’s messy and constantly in flux. Hence, the work presented in this section of the XYZ website is not very organized or sequential at the present time, and it is in a first- draft form waiting to be seriously edited. The links below go to the “by George” blog, where these particular articles are labeled as “Posts from the ‘Where Now?’ Memoir.” Feel free to comment on these posts if there is something within them that strikes.  Many more posts coming on the near horizon.